Software Quality Gets Better through Standardization NOT Innovation

DARPA’s quest for better software quality is honorable but misguided.

What Do Software Analytics and Your Doctor Have in Common?

As it turns out, plenty.
Recently, the U.S. government has implemented healthcare reimbursements based on the outcome of medical treatments, rather than a traditional fee-for-service approach.   These performance-based programs are designed to improve healthcare quality while lowering treatment cost.  It’s this outcomes-based approach that Fortune 500 companies are considering as a way of reducing ADM costs while improving software quality.

We’re Growing! Linda Calabrese Joins CAST from Oracle

Linda Calabrese joins CAST as VP Business Development, North America from Oracle, where she was their Strategic Client Director, and previous to that Strategic Sales Executive at Sun Microsystems.  After 20 years of experience in sales, strategy, and account management, with a proven ability in driving results and building key relationships across a diverse array of organizations, Linda is a vital and welcome addition to the CAST North America Team.
Learn more about what Linda Calabrese will be contributing to at CAST here.

The Importance of Checking Software Risk and Software Quality: A Wake-Up Call to Firms Across the Globe

If you’ve read the news lately, you’ve seen headline after headline (some, even on our blog) about computer glitches, technical failures, software risk, and hacks.  The health of applications is now under more microscopic attention than ever before – because no matter whether internal or external causes prompt a software outage, the security and stability of your applications are paramount.

Software Risk: A Tale of Technology Woes and Failures

In 2014, the IT infrastructure at the Federal government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) was upgraded from a security rating of “material weakness” to one of “significant deficiency,” according to The Wall Street Journal’s CIO Report. Which means that the OPM, even after upgrading to mitigate software risk, wasn’t up to snuff. That is – to put simply – unacceptable. It is also both a dismal and infuriating fact to learn – especially for those who were among the 21 million present and past Federal employees, revealed last week, to have had their Social Security numbers and other personal information stolen in the recent data breach.

An Open Letter to the CIOs of Global 2000 Companies

We’re sure that by now, you’ve seen all of the stories about last week’s computer turmoil at the New York Stock Exchange, United Airlines, the Wall Street Journal, and TD Ameritrade.  And as a top-level executive you’ve probably launched an internal review, or at least asked yourself, “Could it happen here?”
The simple answer is, unfortunately, “yes, it most definitely could.”

The Rule of Three: NYSE, UAL, and WSJ Operations Foiled by Their Own Systems

The events of last Wednesday proved that things often do come in threes. The “rule of three” reared its ugly head, as technical failures occurred at three large American organizations: the New York Stock Exchange, United Airlines, and The Wall Street Journal. United Airlines grounded all flights nationwide, wasn’t able to conduct background checks of passengers, and left flight attendants handwriting tickets (many of which were not accepted by TSA agents). Then, the NYSE suspended trading for almost four hours, the first time in a decade that trading was halted during regular business hours. The Wall Street Journal’s homepage also faced difficulties and was offline for almost an hour.