A Code Quality Problem in Washington State Puts Dangerous Criminals Back on the Street

We always hear about issues with systems, applications, or services caused by poor code quality or missed defects, but what happens when these problems become life threatening? Recently an article posted by npr discussed the early release of dangerous prisoners who are now being charged for murder. According to the article, Governor Jay Inslee of Washington State reported that more than 3,200 prisoners were released early due to a software defect.
This was not a result of good behavior, but rather an issue caused by a software glitch within the Department of Corrections. As reported by the governor’s general counsel, Nick Brown, approximately 3% of the occurrences since 2002 should not have been allowed. This software glitch has gone unnoticed for more than 10 years and as a result dangerous criminals have made their way back into society.

The HSBC Failure Has Many Wondering: Are Banking Providers Taking the Appropriate Measures to Ensure Code Quality and System Dependability?

The banking industry has definitely had its share of ups and downs when it comes to service reliability. In the past year, there have been a number of instances where customers have been unable to gain access to funds, receive deposits, and pay bills. As reported in an article by theguardian, HSBC experienced a system failure at the end of August, which left thousands of their customers in a bind over a major banking holiday.
 
This “technology glitch”, as reported by HSBC, prevented customers from being paid their salaries. The reported system failure made it impossible for employers to access their business banking accounts. A staggering number of banks have experienced system failures and service issues like this one. This raises a question: Is poor code quality becoming a big problem for the banking industry?

IT Leaders Address the Value of Software Measurement & Government Mandates Impacting Development

IT leaders from throughout the federal government discussed the value of how software measurement can positively impact their development process at CAST’s recent Cyber Risk Measurement Workshop in Arlington, VA – just outside of the Washington, D.C. area. The event brought together more than 40 IT leaders from several governmental agencies, including the Department of Defense and Department of State, system integrators and other related organizations. The group shared their experiences in how their respective organizations are driving value to end users and taxpayers.
Measuring and managing software quality is not just about compliance with government mandates, but rather around the proposition that strong software quality, security and sustainability are paramount. However, compliance remains essential. Three primary points around software compliance voiced by attendees were:

Government mandates point to the fact that software must have a measurement component
Industry standards, such as the Consortium for IT Software Quality (CISQ) and The Object Management Group (OMG) are available and should be leveraged
Technology solutions exist to help public sector firms address these mandates

Software Risk: Executive Insights on Application Resiliency


Software risks to the business, specifically Application Resiliency, headline a recent executive roundtable hosted by CAST and sponsored by IBM Italy, ZeroUno and the Boston Consulting Group.  European IT executives from the financial services industry assembled to debate the importance of mitigating software risks to their business.

IT Trends 2016: Insights from the CAST CIO and IT Leaders’ Roundtable Discussion

Last week, CAST, a global leader in software analytics, invited more than 100 IT professionals to participate in a software risk and analytics roundtable in New York, NY. The daylong exchange included CIOs, industry analysts, systems integrators and IT advisory firms. As an outcome of this gathering, CAST published an IT Trends 2016 Report. The following post attempts to capture some of the exchange between participants and key takeaways.

What Do Software Analytics and Your Doctor Have in Common?

As it turns out, plenty.
Recently, the U.S. government has implemented healthcare reimbursements based on the outcome of medical treatments, rather than a traditional fee-for-service approach.   These performance-based programs are designed to improve healthcare quality while lowering treatment cost.  It’s this outcomes-based approach that Fortune 500 companies are considering as a way of reducing ADM costs while improving software quality.

The Rule of Three: NYSE, UAL, and WSJ Operations Foiled by Their Own Systems

The events of last Wednesday proved that things often do come in threes. The “rule of three” reared its ugly head, as technical failures occurred at three large American organizations: the New York Stock Exchange, United Airlines, and The Wall Street Journal. United Airlines grounded all flights nationwide, wasn’t able to conduct background checks of passengers, and left flight attendants handwriting tickets (many of which were not accepted by TSA agents). Then, the NYSE suspended trading for almost four hours, the first time in a decade that trading was halted during regular business hours. The Wall Street Journal’s homepage also faced difficulties and was offline for almost an hour.