Software Complexity Is Killing Us

While you’re reading this article, if you come across words – and even sentences – that you don’t understand, there’s a high chance you feel like developers do when they’re looking at lines of code with a high level of nested complexity. A high level of software complexity can make it difficult to determine architectural hotspots where risk and cost emanate.

Application Security in the Internet of Things

High-capacity network bandwidth has become more widely available, and we have quickly tapped into every last inch of its capacity. More devices are built with wi-fi capabilities, the costs of mobile devices are going down and smartphones are in the hands of more people than ever before. In fact, Apple might have already exhausted the market and is seeing drastically lower sales forecasts for the iPhone.
We are moving into an era in which virtually any device will connect to the Internet. Phones, fitness trackers, dishwashers, televisions, espresso machines, home security systems, cars. The list goes on. Analyst firm Gartner estimates that over 20 billion connectable devices will exist worldwide by 2020. Welcome to IoT—the Internet of Things. A giant network of connectable things.

Adding Measurement to Your Application Outsourcing

A recurring issue for IT and business management is whether it’s best to build an in-house team or outsource the development of software applications. Some of the biggest factors when contemplating application outsourcing are cost, security and loss of control.
Business agility remains a top priority, but this puts added pressure on teams to move fast, and can sometimes lead to rushed projects and a lack of attention to detail. When in-house teams are under tight deadline restrictions, corners can get cut. In fact, most in the developer community agree that outsourcing is the best way to go for timely and on-budget development projects.

Using Code Quality Metrics to Improve Application Performance

For years refactoring software has been a common process used to improve the quality, efficiency, and maintainability of an application. However, a recent article by IT World discusses how CIOs may not be getting a valuable return on their investment of time and effort into the refactoring process. While many believe refactoring reduces the risk of future headaches, new findings acquired through a study by Sri Lanka researchers suggests code quality is not improved significantly by refactoring.

A Code Quality Problem in Washington State Puts Dangerous Criminals Back on the Street

We always hear about issues with systems, applications, or services caused by poor code quality or missed defects, but what happens when these problems become life threatening? Recently an article posted by npr discussed the early release of dangerous prisoners who are now being charged for murder. According to the article, Governor Jay Inslee of Washington State reported that more than 3,200 prisoners were released early due to a software defect.
This was not a result of good behavior, but rather an issue caused by a software glitch within the Department of Corrections. As reported by the governor’s general counsel, Nick Brown, approximately 3% of the occurrences since 2002 should not have been allowed. This software glitch has gone unnoticed for more than 10 years and as a result dangerous criminals have made their way back into society.

IT Leaders Address the Value of Software Measurement & Government Mandates Impacting Development

IT leaders from throughout the federal government discussed the value of how software measurement can positively impact their development process at CAST’s recent Cyber Risk Measurement Workshop in Arlington, VA – just outside of the Washington, D.C. area. The event brought together more than 40 IT leaders from several governmental agencies, including the Department of Defense and Department of State, system integrators and other related organizations. The group shared their experiences in how their respective organizations are driving value to end users and taxpayers.
Measuring and managing software quality is not just about compliance with government mandates, but rather around the proposition that strong software quality, security and sustainability are paramount. However, compliance remains essential. Three primary points around software compliance voiced by attendees were:

Government mandates point to the fact that software must have a measurement component
Industry standards, such as the Consortium for IT Software Quality (CISQ) and The Object Management Group (OMG) are available and should be leveraged
Technology solutions exist to help public sector firms address these mandates

Key Discussion Points from Forrester Webinar: Agile Portfolio Management Requires Rapid Transparency

Application portfolio analysis was at the center of discussion as Forrester Research Vice President and Principal Analyst, Margo Visitacion, presented how Agile development is affecting the application development process and IT’s portfolio planning. Ms. Visitacion explained that in the “Age of the customer,” they want more for less and expect companies to fluidly change based on their needs and demands. As companies shift their attention to customers’ experiences rather than production figures, it’s leading directly to higher revenue and a longer-lasting relationships.
So how do organizations remain agile to customer needs? They employ an Agile portfolio management process that collects metrics while aligning with the budgeting process; understanding that requirements will change. Using this strategy, companies gain clear visibility into their portfolio to measure risk, cost and complexity based upon objective measurements. The data collected during development enables them to defend current positioning and communicate more effectively with the business.
Here are some recent thought provoking questions, along with supporting answers, which we received during the Forrester webinar: